Does the range of motion of the cervical spine increase after mobilisation? A comparison of two Cyriax mobilisation techniques.

Capra, Gianpiero (2017) Does the range of motion of the cervical spine increase after mobilisation? A comparison of two Cyriax mobilisation techniques. Masters thesis, Middlesex Univesrity London UK.

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Abstract

Objectives: The aims of this study were to measure changes in Range of Motion (ROM) using two mobilisation techniques (manual traction and antero-posterior (AP) glide) and to compare the magnitude of changes in cervical ROM with two techniques. Design: Pre- and post-interventional study with crossover design. Setting: The Rehabilitation Research Laboratory (SUPSI-2rLab) at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland (SUPSI Manno Switzerland). Participants: Thirty-six healthy volunteers comprised of lecturers and administrative workers at the university were enrolled in the study. Results: Twenty-four active ROM measurements were taken for all participants (six directions, before and after using the two mobilisation techniques). All of the measurements taken after the mobilisations showed an increase compared to the baseline; however, in six of the 12 directions, the ROM showed a significant difference (p<0.05): right rotation, left rotation, right side flexion after manual traction and right rotation, left rotation and extension after AP Glide. Both the AP glide technique and manual traction proved to be effective in three directions; the comparison between the two techniques showed that there was no significant difference when the post-treatment Cervical Range of Motion (CROM) results were compared. Extension after AP glide showed the greatest increase in CROM, which supports the use of the technique as originally described. Conclusion: The present study showed that the two studied mobilisation techniques could immediately increase the CROM in healthy volunteers. In a clinical scenario, the AP glide is applied to gain CROM in extension; the study confirmed that the technique could increase the CROM in that direction. Further studies are needed to show the clinical applicability to neck pain in the patient population.

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