The Teaching Brain: Beyond the Science of Teaching and Educational Neuroscience

Gola, G. and Angioletti, L. and Cassioli, F. and Balconi, M. (2022) The Teaching Brain: Beyond the Science of Teaching and Educational Neuroscience. Frontiers in Psychology, 13 (823832).

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Gola G, Angioletti L, Cassioli F and Balconi M (2022) The Teaching Brain- Beyond the Science of Teaching and Educational Neuroscience. Front. Psychol. 13-823832.pdf

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Abstract

The field of neurodidactics studies has amplified knowledge about learning processes, focusing on the learning subject and the implications for teaching-learning brain (Goswami, 2004; Strauss, 2005; Battro, 2007, 2010; Fischer, 2009; Fischer and Daniel, 2009; Geake, 2009; Immordino-Yang, 2016; Willingham, 2017; Tibke, 2019). The data and research supported by neuroscience that invest at different levels the theories and practices of education are not new, by way of example: Iran-Nejad et al. (1992) stressed the value of a biological perspective in education; Jensen (2005) connects the role of different cognitive processes (such as emotions, attention, motivation, and rewards) to learning processes (e.g., he discusses why the stress response impedes learning), Willingham and Llyod (2007) describe four techniques to integrate neuroscientific data into the psychological theory of educational constructs (such as reading), and Schwartz (2015) presented the evolution of research at the intersection between neuroscience and education.

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