Perfusion of the skin's microcirculation after cold-water immersion (10°C) and partial-body cryotherapy (-135°C).

Hohenauer, Erich and Deliens, Tom and Clarys, Peter and Clijsen, Ron (2019) Perfusion of the skin's microcirculation after cold-water immersion (10°C) and partial-body cryotherapy (-135°C). UNSPECIFIED. Skin Research and Technology.

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full/10.1111/srt.12703 - Published Version

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Investigations of the perfusion of the skin's microcirculation with laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) after cold treatments are rare. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects between cold-water immersion (CWI) conduction and partial-body cryotherapy (PBC) convection on perfusion of the microcirculation and skin temperature on the thigh. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty healthy males were randomly allocated to CWI (10°C for 10 minutes) or PBC (-60°C for 30 seconds, -135°C for 2 minutes). Perfusion and skin temperature measurements were conducted on the anterior thigh region up to 60 minutes post-treatment. RESULTS: Cold-water immersion decreased perfusion of the microcirculation significantly compared to baseline values between 10 minutes (P = 0.003) and 30 minutes (P = 0.01) post-treatment. PBC increased perfusion of the microcirculation and decreased skin temperature only at the first measurement interval (0 minute, both P = 0.01) post-treatment. Additionally, local skin temperature was significantly decreased compared to baseline values only after CWI up to 30 minutes (P = 0.04) post-treatment. CONCLUSION: Cold-water immersion reduced local skin microcirculation and skin temperature while PBC only slightly increased the perfusion of the microcirculation immediately after the treatment. For cooling purposes, the conduction method seems superior compared to the convection method, assessed with a LSCI device.

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