Particle size reduction and encapsulation affect the bioavailability of ferric pyrophosphate in rats

Wegmuller, R and Zimmermann, Michael B. and Moretti, Diego and Arnold, M and Langhans, W and Hurrell, Richard F. (2004) Particle size reduction and encapsulation affect the bioavailability of ferric pyrophosphate in rats. UNSPECIFIED. JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 134 (12). pp. 3301-3304.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Particle size is an important determinant of Fe absorption from poorly soluble Fe compounds in foods. Decreasing the particle size of elemental iron powders increases their absorption. The effect of a reduction in particle size on the bioavailability of ferric pyrophosphate (FePP) is unclear. Encapsulation of iron compounds for food fortification may protect against adverse sensory changes, but at the same time may reduce bioavailability. The hemoglobin (Hb) repletion method in weanling Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 100) was used to compare the, relative bioavailability (RBV) of 4 forms of FePP: 1) regular FePP mean particle size (MPS) approximate to 21 mum]; 2) MPS approximate to 2.5 mum; 3) MPS approximate to 2.5 mum encapsulated in hydrogenated palm oil; and 4) MPS approximate to 0.5 mum with emulsifiers. The RBV compared with ferrous sulfate was calculated by the slope-ratio technique. The RBV was 43% for encapsulated MPS approximate to 2.5 mum, significantly lower than the other FePP compounds (P < 0.05), 59% for the regular FePP, and 69% for MPS approximate to 2.5 mum, not different from each other but significantly lower than ferrous sulfate (P < 0.05), and 95% for emulsified MPS approximate to 0.5 mum, comparable to ferrous sulfate. Encapsulation of FePP with hydrogenated palm oil at a capsule:substrate ratio of 60:40 decreased RBV. Particle size reduction increases the RBV of FePP and may make this compound more useful for food fortification.

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item